Recognising that community radio is an ideal means of fostering freedom of expression and information, the development of culture, the freedom of form and confront opinions and active participation in local life; noting that different cultures and traditions lead to diversity of forms of community radio; this Charter identifies objectives which community radio stations share and should strive to achieve.

Community radio stations:

1. promote the right to communicate, assist the free flow of information and opinions, encourage creative expression and contribute to the democratic process and a pluralist society;

2. provide access to training, production and distribution facilities; encourage local creative talent and foster local traditions; and provide programmes for the benefit, entertainment, education and development of their listeners;

3. seek to have their ownership representative of local geographically recognisable communities or of communities of common interest;

4. are editorially independent of government, commercial and religious institutions and political parties in determining their programme policy;

5. provide a right of access to minority and marginalised groups and promote and protect cultural and linguistic diversity;

6. seek to honestly inform their listeners on the basis of information drawn from a diversity of sources and provide a right of reply to any person or organisation subject to serious misrepresentation;

7. are established as organisations which are not run with a view to profit and ensure their independence by being financed from a variety of sources;

8. recognise and respect the contribution of volunteers, recognise the right of paid workers to join trade unions and provide satisfactory working conditions for both;

9. operate management, programming and employment practices which oppose discriminations and which are open and accountable to all supporters, staff and volunteers;

10. foster exchange between community radio broadcasters using communications to develop greater understanding in support of peace, tolerance, democracy and development.

Adopted on 18 September 1994 in Ljubljana, Slovenia at the first AMARC Pan-European Conference of Community Radio Broadcasters

AMARC Argentina members meeting in Bahía Blanca

AMARC Argentina members gathered in the middle of June to share knowledge, practices and realities, and participate in intense debates in around the right to communication and current Argentina.

The meeting ended on Monday, June 17, 2019  in Bahía Blanca, where FM De la Calle is located, a station that is about to celebrate its 30th anniversary and that received its first broadcasting license this year. During three days, having started on Saturday, radios from Cordoba, Mendoza, Buenos Aires, Chubut, Rio Negro, Santa Fe, La Pampa, Autonomous City of Buenos Aires and Jujuy, discussed how the acute economic situation to which the policies driven by the government of Macri are reflected in the daily realities of their work: the radios are affected by the same realities of the communities they have emanated: increasing taxation, loss of purchasing power, inflationary levels, housing deficit, general crisis of public education, health and culture systems.

“For this reason and considering the rich diversity expressed by the radios that make up AMARC (Argentina) we ratify our strong commitment to redouble all efforts, within the framework of this economic situation, to guarantee the right to communicate. We are community radio stations that we fight for daily. We do in different airs but with the same breath,” said the AMARC Argentina Press Release.

The AMARC Assembly comes after the national protest staged by community radios throughout the country to highlight the government inaction in the implementation of the agreements with the Community Radios in the country on 2 May 2019. There were protests outside the government delegations in Córdoba, Mendoza y Ciudad de Buenos Aires.

“Ten years after the approval of the Audiovisual Communication Services Law, the Argentine state still does not comply with its own constitutional norms and mandates. Without community media there is no democracy and even the government did not articulate the necessary resources to grant the corresponding licenses to Community media, that is, to the communities of the Argentine territory. Likewise, Community Radios ratified the claim of the due public financing through competitive funds, which are established rights, in order that this right to communication has material possibilities of concrete development.

“On the other hand, for civil society in every corner of Argentina, it is important the functioning of the organizations that were born in order to ensure the common rights of the public, the audiences and the makers of community communication. In this regard, we express our deep concern over the progressive de-funding of the Public Defender’s Office. We demand from the government its immediate budgetary normalization so that it has the necessary resources to fulfill the tasks for which it was created.”



The AMARC assembly also decided to ratify its position regarding the need to deepen our airs and our practices through a gender perspective approach and also consolidated debates about their structural organisation.  “We celebrate the steps taken towards greater regional work, in a country that declares itself plurinational, heterogeneous, multicultural and diverse, but which still finds it difficult to assign the same importance to any place in its territory.”

“This is, moreover, an open invitation to every communal and popular communication project of any place: in AMARC there is room for every expression born of this need to struggle for the right to communicate and each expression in turn is a constituent part of a collective that is the whole in each of its parts.

“In a hostile context from the macro-political point of view that consider that communication is not a right but a business and propose that it should be in the hands of concentrated groups of the economy, we also call for unity of action and all the networks in our sector. We see with deep concern that, on election eve, the debate on the application of the Audiovisual Communication Services Law and, before, the very concept that society has the right to communication and information is not on the agenda of the public statements so far. We believe that it is enough reason why what unites us to all networks, our vision of communication as a fundamental human right, leads us to unite and act together.”



The proliferation of mass media and new technologies has brought about decisive changes in and challenges to human communication processes and behaviour. The change in the media landscape has also impacted the role and social, professional and ethical responsibilities of journalists. These changes in the role that the media plays in the life of citizens have highlighted the importance of responsible media reporting.

Media communicators and audiences now face the task to separate facts from fiction in media texts. However, it is the responsibility of journalists and broadcasters in traditional and online media to consider the elements that they introduce in the content they are producing, the language that they use and the message they are trying to convene. There have been initiatives spearheaded by journalists and media organisations (BBC, The Guardian…) to go back to the essence of journalism by retaking the task of fact checking, and applying what is consider the five core principles of ethical journalism: truth and accuracy; independence; fairness and impartiality; humanity; and accountability. (see Ethical Journalist Network)

The Ethical Media for Active Citizenship (EMAC) project aims to develop a training course delivering media literacy tools while providing citizens and media activists with valuable competences to face very topical challenges presented to both, media producers and audiences (fake news/alternative facts, infomercials vs. information, freedom of speech and hate speech, diversity and pluralism in media, production values and content placement). The project is coordinated by NEAR FM (Ireland) and the partnership includes Radio Corax (Halle, Germany), Radio Wüste Welle (Tübingen, Germany), Commit (Austria), EMARTV (Andalucia, Spain) and AMARC Europe (Brussels, Belgium).

So far, the partners have put together a Guidelines and Terminology document, selected relevant activities that focus on the reinforcement of a diversity approach to journalistic and production skills. Some of the activities have been already trialled in pilot training workshops in Germany, Austria, Ireland and Spain. We are now facing the final stage of the project, where all the information and activities will be translated into the languages of the partnership (German, Spanish and English and then uploaded to an online training platform that will be accessible to the general public and that could be used as a e-learning tool or as a training resource.

As part of the project, partners will also produce eight radio programmes dealing with the issue of fact accuracy, fake news and ethical and responsible journalism that will be uploaded in the website and that could be used as training resources in each country.

The proliferation of mass media and new technologies has brought about decisive changes in and challenges to human communication processes and behaviour. The change in the media landscape has also impacted the role and social, professional and ethical responsibilities of journalists. These changes in the role that media plays in the life of citizens has highlighted the importance of responsible media reporting.

Media communicators and audiences now face the task to separate facts from fiction in media texts. However, it is the responsibility of journalists and broadcasters in traditional and online media to consider the elements that they introduce in the content they are producing, the language that they use and the message they are trying to convene. There have been initiatives spearheaded by journalists and media organisations (BBC, The Guardian…) to go back to the essence of journalism by retaking the task of fact checking, and applying what is consider the five core principles of ethical journalism: truth and accuracy; independence; fairness and impartiality; humanity; and accountability. (see Ethical Journalist Network)

The Ethical Media for Active Citizenship (EMAC) project aims to develop a training course delivering media literacy tools while providing citizens and media activists with valuable competences to face very topical challenges presented to both, media producers and audiences (fake news/alternative facts, infomercials vs. information, freedom of speech and hate speech, diversity and pluralism in media, production values and content placement). The project is coordinated by NEAR FM (Ireland) and the partnership includes Radio Corax (Halle, Germany), Radio Wüste Welle (Tübingen, Germany), Commit (Austria), EMARTV (Andalucia, Spain) and AMARC Europe (Brussels, Belgium).

Partner Meeting in Sevilla, Spain

So far, the partners have put together a Guidelines and Terminology document, selected relevant activities that focus on the reinforcement of a diversity approach to journalistic and production skills. Some of the activities have been already trialled in pilot training workshops in Germany, Austria, Ireland and Spain. We are now facing the final stage of the project, where all the information and activities will be translated into the languages of the partnership (German, Spanish and English and then uploaded to an online training platform that will be accessible to the general public and that could be used as a e-learning tool or as a training resource.

As part of the project, partners will also produce eight radio programmes dealing with the issue of fact accuracy, fake news and ethical and responsible journalism that will be uploaded in the website and that could be used as training resources in each country.

On this March 21, UN International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, the World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters, AMARC, and its radio members across Africa, Latin America, North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and the MENA region, will raise their volume against racism and discrimination.

We are living in a World where increasing nationalist populism and supremacist ideology dramaticly divide the populations between those who have and those who have not access to basic human rights, equal opportunities or access to public goods such as water and food. Those inequalities are the core reasons for migrations that will continue, despite the walls that everyday are built in richest countries, brick after brick of discriminatory policies and discrimination practices.

Community radios are anti-fascist and anti-racist, and this is the reason why we call our members to raise the volume against every form of racial discrimination. AMARC calls for (radio) bridges and not walls. Diversity in broadcasting should reflect the diversity in the society, but it is up to journalists and radio activists to approach this diversity in the full respect of human dignity, besides race or ethical origins.

AMARC calls its members to the respect of ethical codes, such as the Chart of Rome, regarding migrants, asylum seekers and refugees, and strongly encourage its radio members to continue fighting against any form of fascism and discrimination.

Community Radios are Against Racism.